Do It Green (“DIG”) – Making Healthy Communities One Event at a Time

Posted on Posted in ATB-X, Calgary Business


Imagine a world where landfills don’t exist.
DIG was created as a result of the founders acting as volunteer environmental managers for the Calgary Folk Festival in 2010. DIG has a multi-pronged approach to reduce waste going to landfills. First, Do It Green offers completely compostable products for use at events. Those products, together with the 4,000 liter 3-stage filtered water container DIG provides, eliminate water bottle usage. Second, DIG offers training, education and analysis on how events can reduce their waste. Third, DIG hauls away the recycled materials. DIG also has concern for reduction of energy usage at events and supplies bike valets, as well as sustainable power in the form of portable electric batteries, chargeable three ways: from the grid, by solar, or by bike.
Do It Green specifically targets events, corporations, and the film and TV industry. The 2016 Calgary Stampede was one such event, where DIG diverted 18 tonnes of waste from the Stampede
DIG recently became Calgary’s eighth certified “B” Corporation and with that designation, joined over 1,900 companies world wide. A certified “B” corporation is one who is required to meet higher social and environmental performance, transparency and accountability. The process to become certified is rigorous, but one DIG has been working towards since its’ inception. DIG feels this certification will provide added value to their clients by enhancing consumer confidence In DIG’s programs.

Did You Know?
Alberta is one of the highest waste producers in Canada and Canada itself is in the bottom five of waste production – In 2012 1,000 kilograms of waste per person, per capita was produced. Land mass may play a role in our waste production; Japan, which has less land mass, and a denser population than Canada’s, produces the least amount of waste per capita.

 


DIG’s mission: to reach 16 million people through waste, water and energy awareness programs such that 100 metric tonnes are diverted away from the landfills by 2020. With over 35 tonnes diverted to date, imagining a world with no landfills just got a lot easier, thanks to DIG.

 

Written By:

Kathy Dueck